August 29

Event:
1765
Augustus Johnston, Stamp Distributor of Rhode Island resigns his office due to the wide spread resistance of the Stamp Act. His resignation is followed by many others in the colonies.

1774 John Jay one of New York delegates to the First Continental Congress leaves quietly from New York to Philadelphia. The other delegates would leave on September 1 under great fanfare.

1775 A hurricane hits the Outer Banks of North Carolina. It turned northeastward and left the state on the 2nd, bringing heavy wind and rain to southeastern Virginia. The hurricane stuck the eastern coast of Newfoundland on September 9, 1775. Approximately 4000 sailors, mostly from England and Ireland, were reported to have been drowned; a localized, storm surge is reported to have reached heights of between 20 and 30 feet. The hurricane, also known as the Independence Hurricane is Canada’s most tragic natural disaster, as well as the sixth deadliest hurricane in history with 4163 killed.

1778 The First Rhode Island Regiment, composed of freed slaves, repulses British and Hessian troops near Portsmouth.

1779 The American forces defeats a combined Indian and Loyalist forces at Elmira, New York. After the victory, American troops head northwest and destroy nearly 40 Cayuga and Seneca Indian villages in retaliation for the campaign of terror against American settlers.

1786 Shays’ Rebellion an armed uprising in western Massachusetts begins. The rebels were led by Daniel Shays and known as Shaysites. They were mostly small farmers angered by crushing debt and taxes which failure to repay often resulted in imprisonment in debtor’s prisons. A Massachusetts militia that had been raised as a private army, defeated the Shaysite forces on February 3, 1787. The lack of an institutional response to the uprising energized calls to reevaluate the Articles of Confederation.

*****
For a Spiral Bound book with information on events that happened on each day of the year during the American Revolutionary Period goto: American Revolutionary Period: 1760-1789

Advertisements
Published in: on August 29, 2009 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://thisdayarp.wordpress.com/2009/08/29/august-29/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: